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31st January 2022

Dr Jiawen Li’s National Recognition for Lifesaving Work

Jiawen Li

We’re thrilled to share researcher Dr Jiawen Li, from the University of Adelaide, was awarded a L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Fellowship for her dedication to research in cardiology.

AHR is currently funding part of Dr Li’s research developing the world-smallest 3D-printed imaging catheter to identify people at risk of a heart attack before they experience any life-threatening symptoms.

If Dr Li and her team are successful, they have the potential to help the 20 million heart disease patients worldwide which present to emergency departments each year!

Spotlight on Dr Li’s Dedication

Each year, the L’Oréal-UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) Fellowships recognise the achievements of exceptional female scientists at different stages of their careers and award them with Fellowships to help further their research.

The For Women in Science Fellowship (Australia and New Zealand) was launched in 2007 and since then, it has recognised 54 outstanding local scientists, supporting them to continue their research and help them rise to leadership positions in their field of expertise.

Dr Jiawen Li is developing the world-smallest 3D-printed imaging catheter to identify people at risk of a heart attack before they experience any life-threatening symptoms.

Dr Li was one of four Australians who were successful in securing this Fellowship. Growing up, Dr Li was inspired by her parents as her father is a biologist and her mother a GP. She said it felt natural for her to follow in the field of her parents.

“Science was part of my daily life. Conversations at the dinner table revolved around interesting challenges they both faced at work and how they went about solving them,” Dr Li said.

“This really influenced me in not only planting the seeds of scientific curiosity, but also a love for problem solving.”

Dr Li’s work is based in a male-dominated field—engineering.

“Only a few women engineers have become leaders, and many junior female researchers lose their competitive edge after having a child, mainly due to not being able to dedicate as much time to establish their own research area compared to their male peers,” Dr Li said.

“More than 25 per cent of Australians were born overseas and many of us speak English as a second language. Seeing researchers with diverse faces and accents may make new migrants and their children more likely to study and contribute to science and engineering.”

Congratulations Dr Li on this incredible achievement!

We look forward to updating you on her innovative research.

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